Posts Tagged With: Arrian

14. Halicarnassus – Myndus

Crossing Asia Minor with Alexander

‘… [Alexander] made camp against Halicarnassus about half a mile from the city [and] prepared for a long siege…’
(Arrian I.20.2)

Text used: Arrian ‘Alexander the Great‘ OUP 2013 (translated by Martin Hammond)

During the siege of Halicarnassus, Alexander investigated ‘the possibility of a sudden quick raid to capture Myndus’ (Arr. I.20.5) as he realised that controlling it would help with the siege. The Myndians, however, told Alexander that if he could approach the city without being seen, he would be allowed in. At midnight, Alexander came up to the city but the gates remained closed. Despite not having brought his siege engines with him, Alexander attacked the city. The Myndians resisted and he was forced to withdraw.

One of the wonders of the ancient world – the mausoleum at Halicarnassus

Credit Where It’s Due
The Mausoleum: Britannica

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13. Mycale and Miletus-Halicarnassus

Crossing Asia Minor with Alexander

  • Mycale (Philotas)
  • Miletus-Halicarnassus (Alexander)

‘… Alexander sent Philotas to Mycale with the cavalry and three brigades of infantry, with instructions to prevent the Persians leaving their ships…’
(Arrian I.19.8)

‘… Alexander set out for Caria, on reports that a substantial force of barbarians and foreign mercenaries was concentrated in Halicarnassus [Bodrum]. He captured the cities between Miletus and Halicarnassus…’
(Arrian I.20.2)

Text used: Arrian ‘Alexander the Great‘ OUP 2013 (translated by Martin Hammond)

Map of Asia Minor

Credit Where It’s Due
Map of Asia Minor: ResearchGate

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12. Miletus

Crossing Asia Minor

‘On the next day, [Alexander] took the rest of the infantry, the archers, the Agrianians, the Thracian cavalry, the royal squadron of the Companions, and three further squadrons, and set out for Miletus. What they call the outer city had been abandoned by its garrison, and Alexander took it on the first assault…’
(Arrian I.18.3)

Text used: Arrian ‘Alexander the Great‘ OUP 2013 (translated by Martin Hammond)

When Alexander laid siege to Miletus, a Persian fleet approached the city’s port hoping to bring help to the city. They were unable to do so, however, as the Macedonian navy – led by Nicanor – was blockading it. The Persian fleet was forced to anchor ‘under Mount Mycale’ (Arr. I.18.5) and eventually, withdraw.

Amphitheatre at Miletus

Credit Where It’s Due
Amphitheatre at Miletus: Wikipedia

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11. Ephesus

Crossing Asia Minor with Alexander

‘Alexander reached Ephesus after three days. He restored the exiles who had been banished from the city for supporting him, broke up the oligarchy, and installed a democracy.’
(Arrian I.17.10)

Text used: Arrian ‘Alexander the Great‘ OUP 2013 (translated by Martin Hammond)

Alexander was joined in Ephesus by ambassadors from Magnesia and Tralles who wished to surrender their cities to him. Alexander accepted their surrender and sent Parmenion to secure the cities. He also sent Alcimachus son of Agathocles ‘to the Aolian cities and those in Ionia still under barbarian control’ (Arr. I.18.1) to secure them.

Amphitheatre at Magnesia

Credit Where It’s Due
Amphitheatre at Magnesia: Wikipedia

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10. Dascylium and Sardis

Crossing Asia Minor with Alexander

  • Dascylium (Parmenion)
  • Sardis (Alexander)

‘[Alexander] sent Parmenion to take Dascylium… He himself marched on towards Sardis. When he was about eight miles away from the city he was met by Mithrenes, the commander of the citadel garrison, and the leading men of Sardis: they surrendered the city to him… Alexander himself camped by the river Hermus…’
(Arrian I.17.2-4)

Text used: Arrian ‘Alexander the Great‘ OUP 2013 (translated by Martin Hammond)

Map showing the location of Dascylium and Sardis

Credit Where It’s Due
Map of Asia Minor: Wikipedia

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9. The Granicus River

Crossing Asia Minor with Alexander

‘Alexander was not far from the Granicus when riders came at speed from the forward posts to report that the Persians were ranged ready for battle on the far bank of the Granicus. Alexander then began to form his entire army for battle.’
(Arrian I.13.2)

Text used: Arrian ‘Alexander the Great‘ OUP 2013 (translated by Martin Hammond)

The Granicus River today

Credit Where It’s Due
Granicus River: Livius

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8. Priapus

Crossing Asia Minor with Alexander

‘Along the route of his march, the city of Priapus was surrendered to him by its inhabitants…’
(Arrian I.12.7)

Text used: Arrian ‘Alexander the Great‘ OUP 2013 (translated by Martin Hammond)

Priapus

Credit Where It’s Due
Priapus: Theoi

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7. Hermotus via Colonae

Crossing Asia Minor with Alexander

‘… he came to Hermotus, passing the city of Colonae on the way.’
(Arrian I.12.6)

Text used: Arrian ‘Alexander the Great‘ OUP 2013 (translated by Martin Hammond)

Statue of Nike because I couldn’t find a map showing the location of Hermotus!

Credit Where It’s Due
Nike: Pinterest

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6. Lampsacus and the Prosactius river

Crossing Asia Minor with Alexander

‘… the day after that he passed by Lampsacus and camped by the river Lampsacus, which flows from the Mount Ida range…’
(Arrian I.12.6)

Text used: Arrian ‘Alexander the Great‘ OUP 2013 (translated by Martin Hammond)

Map of Asia Minor showing the location of Lampsacus

Credit Where It’s Due
Map: Encyclopaedia of the Ancient World

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5. Percote

Crossing Asia Minor with Alexander

‘… the next day he reached Percote…’
(Arrian I.12.6)

Text used: Arrian ‘Alexander the Great‘ OUP 2013 (translated by Martin Hammond)

Light armed soldiers in Alexander’s army (Agrianians)

Credit Where It’s Due
Light Armed Soldiers: Realm of History

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